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Version: v4

Initialization

In Next.js, you can define an API route that will catch all requests that begin with a certain path. Conveniently, this is called Catch all API routes.

When you define a /pages/api/auth/[...nextauth] JS/TS file, you instruct NextAuth.js that every API request beginning with /api/auth/* should be handled by the code written in the [...nextauth] file.

Depending on your use-case, you can initialize NextAuth.js in two different ways:

Simple initialization

In most cases, you won't need to worry about what NextAuth.js does, and you will get by just fine with the following initialization:

/pages/api/auth/[...nextauth].js
import NextAuth from "next-auth"

export default NextAuth({
...
})

Here, you only need to pass your options to NextAuth, and NextAuth does the rest.

This is the preferred initialization in tutorials/other parts of the documentation, as it simplifies the code and reduces potential errors in the authentication flow.

Advanced initialization

If you have a specific use case and need to make NextAuth.js do something slightly different than what it is designed for, keep in mind, the [...nextauth].js config file is still just a regular API Route at the end of the day.

That said, you can initialize NextAuth.js like this:

/pages/api/auth/[...nextauth].ts
import type { NextApiRequest, NextApiResponse } from "next"
import NextAuth from "next-auth"

export default async function auth(req: NextApiRequest, res: NextApiResponse) {
// Do whatever you want here, before the request is passed down to `NextAuth`
return await NextAuth(req, res, {
...
})
}

The ... section will still be your options, but you now have the possibility to execute/modify certain things on the request.

You could for example log the request, add headers, read query or body parameters, whatever you would do in an API route.

tip

Since this is a catch-all route, remember to check what kind of NextAuth.js "action" is running. Compare the REST API with the req.query.nextauth parameter.

For example to execute something on the "callback" action when the request is a POST method, you can check for req.query.nextauth.includes("callback") && req.mehod === "POST"

note

NextAuth will implicitly close the response (by calling res.end, res.send or similar), so you should not run code after NextAuth in the function body. Using return NextAuth makes sure you don't forget that.

Any variable you create this way will be available in the NextAuth options as well, since they are in the same scope.

/pages/api/auth/[...nextauth].ts
import type { NextApiRequest, NextApiResponse } from "next"
import NextAuth from "next-auth"

export default async function auth(req: NextApiRequest, res: NextApiResponse) {

if(req.query.nextauth.includes("callback") && req.method === "POST") {
console.log(
"Handling callback request from my Identity Provider",
req.body
)
}

// Get a custom cookie value from the request
const someCookie = req.cookies["some-custom-cookie"]

return await NextAuth(req, res, {
...
callbacks: {
session({ session, token }) {
// Return a cookie value as part of the session
// This is read when `req.query.nextauth.includes("session") && req.method === "GET"`
session.someCookie = someCookie
return session
}
}
})
}

A practical example could be to not show a certain provider on the default sign-in page, but still be able to sign in with it. (The idea is taken from this discussion):

/pages/api/auth/[...nextauth].js
import NextAuth from "next-auth"
import CredentialsProvider from "next-auth/providers/credentials"
import GoogleProvider from "next-auth/providers/google"

export default async function auth(req, res) {
const providers = [
CredentialsProvider(...),
GoogleProvider(...),
]

const isDefaultSigninPage = req.method === "GET" && req.query.nextauth.includes("signin")

// Will hide the `GoogleProvider` when you visit `/api/auth/signin`
if (isDefaultSigninPage) providers.pop()

return await NextAuth(req, res, {
providers,
...
})
}

For more details on all available actions and which methods are supported, please check out the REST API documentation or the appropriate area in the source code

This way of initializing NextAuth is very powerful, but should be used sparingly.

warning

Changing parts of the request that is essential to NextAuth to do it's job - like messing with the default cookies - can have unforeseen consequences, and have the potential to introduce security holes if done incorrectly. Only change those this if you understand these consequences.